This Week in History – July 25th to July 31st

This Week in History UPPER

The Pandora Society Bureau of Time Travel has collected a handful of historical events from each day of this week in the hopes of inspiring some writer to pen the next great Steampunk novel.


July 25th

robinhood

Warner Baxter plays Joaquin Murrieta in the 1936 film “Robin Hood of El Dorado”

  • 1837 – The first commercial use of an electrical telegraph is successfully demonstrated by William Cooke and Charles Wheatstone on July 25, 1837 between Euston and Camden Town in London.
  • 1853Joaquin Murrieta, the famous Californio bandit known as “Robin Hood of El Dorado”, is killed.
  • 1861American Civil War: The United States Congress passes the Crittenden–Johnson Resolution, stating that the war is being fought to preserve the Union and not to end slavery.


July 26th

  • 1887 – Publication of the Unua Libro, founding the Esperanto movement.
  • 1897Anglo-Afghan War: The Pashtun fakir Saidullah leads an army of more than 10,000 to begin a siege of the British garrison in the Malakand Agency of the North West Frontier Province of India.
  • 1908United States Attorney General Charles Joseph Bonaparte issues an order to immediately staff the Office of the Chief Examiner (later renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation).

July 27th

Vincent van Gogh Grave

The graves of Vincent van Gogh and his brother Theo in Auvers-sur-Oise, France

  • 1866 – The first permanent transatlantic telegraph cable is successfully completed, stretching from Valentia Island, Ireland, to Heart’s Content, Newfoundland.
  • 1890Vincent van Gogh shoots himself and dies two days later.
  • 1900 – Kaiser Wilhelm II makes a speech comparing Germans to Huns; for years afterwards, “Hun” would be a disparaging name for Germans.

July 28th

  • 1866 – At the age of 18, Vinnie Ream becomes the first and youngest female artist to receive a commission from the United States government for a statue (of Abraham Lincoln).
  • 1868 – The 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution is certified, establishing African American citizenship and guaranteeing due process of law.
  • 1914 – In the culmination of the July Crisis, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, igniting World War I.

July 29th

Belle Boyd

Isabella Maria Boyd (May 4th, 1844 – June 11th, 1900), best known as Belle Boyd, as well as Cleopatra of the Secession and Siren of the Shenandoah, was a Confederate spy in the American Civil War.

  • 1864American Civil War: Confederate spy Belle Boyd is arrested by Union troops and detained at the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C.
  • 1899 – The First Hague Convention is signed.
  • 1900 – In Italy, King Umberto I of Italy is assassinated by the anarchist Gaetano Bresci.

July 30th

  • 1865 – The steamboat Brother Jonathan sinks off the coast of Crescent City, California, killing 225 passengers, the deadliest shipwreck on the Pacific Coast of the U.S. at the time.
  • 1866New Orleans, Louisiana‘s Democratic government orders police to raid an integrated Republican Party meeting, killing 40 people and injuring 150.
  • 1871 – The Staten Island Ferry Westfield’s boiler explodes, killing over 85 people.

July 31st

Russo-Japanese War

The Russo-Japanese War (February 8th, 1904 – September 5th, 1905) was fought between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea.

  • 1865 – The first narrow-gauge mainline railway in the world opens at Grandchester, Queensland, Australia.
  • 1874Dr. Patrick Francis Healy became the first Black man to be inaugurated as president of a predominantly White American university.
  • 1904Russo-Japanese War: Battle of Hsimucheng: Units of the Imperial Japanese Army defeat units of the Imperial Russian Army in a strategic confrontation.


 

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