This Day in History – March 16th, 1861

On March 16th, 1861, Edward Clark was promoted to the position of Governor of Texas after the former Governor Houston had been evicted from the position.

Sam Houston

Samuel “Sam” Houston (March 2nd, 1793 – July 26th, 1863)

Samuel “Sam” Houston was an American politician and soldier, best known for his role in bringing Texas into the United States as a constituent state. His victory at the Battle of San Jacinto secured the independence of Texas from Mexico. The only American to be elected governor of two different States (as opposed to territories or indirect appointments), he was also the only Southern governor to oppose secession.

As governor, he refused to swear loyalty to the Confederacy when Texas seceded from the Union in 1861 with the outbreak of the American Civil War, and was removed from office. To avoid bloodshed, he refused an offer of a Union army to put down the Confederate rebellion. Instead, he retired to Huntsville, Texas, where he died before the end of the Civil War.

The namesake of the city which, since the 1980s, has become the fourth largest city in the U.S., Houston’s reputation was sufficiently large that he was honored in numerous ways after his death, among them: a memorial museum, four U.S. warships named USS Houston (AK-1, CA-30, CL-81, and SSN-713), a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, and a prominent roadside statue outside of Huntsville.

Flourish 3

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