Book Review: The Secret of Abdu el Yezdi (Burton and Swinburne 4) by Mark Hodder

At the end of The Expedition to the Mountains of the Moon, our heroes, and in fact time itself, are left in rather dire straights. If you remember, I actually read the books out of order, so for me when I got to the end of book 3, a lot of what I had already […]

Book Review: The Expedition to the Mountains of the Moon (Burton and Swinburne 3) by Mark Hodder

Even though my copy of this book was brand new, it completely deteriorated during my reading. I don’t know if it was the extreme temperatures while passing through Wyoming during my transcontinental drive, or just bad book binding, but it seemed extremely apt given what was happening in this installment of the Burton & Swinburne […]

Book Review: Nefertiti’s Heart (Artifact Hunter 1) by A. W. Exley

Ever since I did my research about Egyptomania I have been dying to get my hands on some Steampunk fiction that played with this topic. When I fired up my Christmas Kindle, I found lots of great Steampunk books out there to download, but they didn’t all hold my interest. Nefertiti’s Heart was the first […]

Book Review: The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man (Burton and Swinburne 2) by Mark Hodder

One of the very first Steampunk books I ever read was Mark Hodder’s The Strange Case of Spring Heeled Jack, and I enjoyed it so much I knew I was destined to read the rest of the series. The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man picks up a few months after the events of book 1. […]

Neil Gaiman’s Tribute to Lovecraft & Sherlock Holmes

I think a bit of serendipity occurred when I found this work via BookBub.
I had just reread and reviewed Roger Zelazny’s take on mixing the world of Lovecraft and Conan Doyle. Now I had the opportunity to read “A Study In Emerald,” by Neil Gaiman, and see how another master storyteller approaches the same set of characters and intermixes the two very diverse story worlds.

In the preface to the collection, Gaiman (2006) explains that he found this to be a unique challenge because the two styles are very much polar opposites. The character of Sherlock Holmes is logical, scientific, and rational. The focus is on solving mysteries and presenting celebrated solutions. Lovecraft’s works proceed on a different basis. Many of his creations were deeply illogical and maintaining the mysteries helped keep humanity sane. “If I was going to tell a story that combined both elements,” Gaiman (2006, pp. 4-5) writes, “There had to be an interesting way to do it that played fair with both Lovecraft and with the creations of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.”

Book Review: The Machine by E. C. Jarvis

I was contacted several weeks ago by a new publishing company called Rambunctious Ramblings (don’t you love that name?!) and given the opportunity to review their first enterprise; a steampunk novel by new author, E. C. Jarvis. The book just came out at the beginning of the month, and I would definitely recommend it to […]

“Letters Between Gentlemen” – Book Review

Sometimes, Steampunk books are serious challenges to the ideals of the Victorian age and tread on the dark side, and other times they are silly fun. Letters Between Gentleman, by award-winning “chap hop” artist Professor Elemental and accomplished author Nimue Brown, is most definitely the latter. As implied by the title, this book is presented as […]

Cassandra Clare’s “Clockwork Princess” – Book Review

Even though all three of Casandra Clare’s Infernal Devices books came out between 2009-2013, I didn’t get around to reading the third one until recently. This is not to say that I wasn’t excited to find out the conclusion, but I didn’t get a chance to pick it up before I left the English-speaking world for […]

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